Consortium

The d-LIVER consortium includes 14 independent organisations from 7 different countries, and is made up of 4 research institutes, 4 academic institutes and 6 commercial companies (4 of which are SMEs). The consortium has been brought together to successfully address an important, unmet clinical need, with each partner contributing their expertise in the different sections of this project. The relatively large number of research institutes and universities in the consortium reflects the highly ambitious and innovative nature of the project, while the industrial partners and end users will ensure that the technical development will be driven by the clinical requirements in order to validate the systems produced and thereby to ensure rapid adoption of the technology in the market place. This ambitious project requires state-of-the-art know-how which is available across the European Union, rather than within any single member state. The interdisciplinary d-LIVER consortium assembles all of the key-elements to successfully execute the proposed work. Each partner has a distinct and complementary role to play in the project and has an international reputation in their specific area of expertise. This is summarised in the table below.

Partner Role in the d-LIVER Project
P1 – Newcastle University (UNEW) – UK
(Diagnostic & Therapeutic Technologies)
Project Coordinator and leader of WP10 – Consortium Management
Biochemical sensor development and testing
P1 – Newcastle University (UNEW) – UK
(Liver Research Group)
Leader of WP8 – Progenitor cells for bio-artificial liver
High-risk bio-artificial liver technology development
Clinical requirements and end user scenarios
Clinical evaluation studies in patient groups
P2 – Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives – Laboratoire d’Electronique et de Technologie de l’Information (CEA-LETI) – France Leader of WP3 – Sensor development
Chemical sensor development
P3 – Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Charité) – Germany
(Department of General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery)
Leader of WP1 – Clinical application scenarios and validation
Clinical requirements and end user scenarios
Clinical validation of bio-artificial liver and LPMS
P3 – Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Charité) – Germany
(Bioreactor Group)
Development of model bio-artificial liver and synthesis system
P4 – Centre Suisse d’Electronique et de Microtechnique (CSEM) – Switzerland
(Systems Engineering Division)
Leader of WP6 – Instrumentation platforms
Instrumentation development and sensor/ICT integration
P5 – Fraunhofer Gesellschaft zur Förderung der angewandten Forschung e.V. – Institut für Biomedizinische Technik (FhG IBMT) – Germany
(Telematics & Intelligent Health Systems Department)
Leader of WP7 – Communications, Patient Management and Decision Support
Development of the LPMS
Development of secure and interoperable communication modules
User interface development
P5 – Fraunhofer Gesellschaft zur Förderung der angewandten Forschung e.V. – Institut für Biomedizinische Technik (FhG IBMT) – Germany
(Biomedical Microsystems Department)
Leader of WP5 – Development and monitoring of Bio artificial Liver Support Unit
Development of model detoxification and synthesis system
P6 – Fraunhofer Gesellschaft zur Förderung der angewandten Forschung e.V. – FhG ICT-IMM (IMM) – Germany Leader of WP4 – Microfluidics, packaging and integration
Development of microfluidics, packaging and integration
P7 – iXscient Ltd. – UK Project Management
Exploitation plans
P8 – WITHDRAWN
P9 – Stiftelsen SINTEF (SINTEF) – Norway Leader of WP2 – System design and medical device regulatory requirements
Development of wearable sensors
Instrumentation development and sensor/ICT integration
P10 – Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV) – Spain Development of electrochemical biochemical and clotting sensors
P11 – AT4 wireless, S.A. – Spain Provision of the data security and privacy framework
Development of communication modules
Validation of ICT platform
P12 – Stem Cell Systems GmbH (SCS) – Germany Clinical requirements and end user scenarios
Development of model detoxification and synthesis system
P13 – enablingMNT GmbH (4M2C) – Germany
(formerly 4M2C Patric Salomon GmbH, 4M2C)
Leader of WP9 – Dissemination, training and exploitation plans
Provision of project website
Management of IPR and exploitation plans, industry workshops and technology roadmap
P14 – STAR Healthcare Management GmbH (STAR) – Germany Development and integration of triaging software
P15 – Istituto Clinico Humanitas (ICH) – Italy Clinical application scenarios and validation